Prime News Ghana

Ghana School of Law shames students for breaching dress code

By Mutala Yakubu
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The Ghana School of Law has shamed some students for breaching their dress code.

The students who are twenty-six in number now have their names captured in the "Book of Shame" for various dress code breaches.

The school administration published their names on the school's notice board for breaching these dress codes.

READ ALSO: We'll ensure Achimota School maintains its brand as a great institution - Dr Adwutum

In a release signed by the Registrar of the school, Juliet Adu-Adjei, it said these students engaged in improper dressing, wearing of anklet, wearing open-toe shoes, not being clean shave and wrong tie colour.

The Registrar then advised all students to go by the school's dress code so they do not attract any sanction.

This has generated some form of debate as it has been connected to Achimota School's decision to deny two students admission over their dreadlocks has been topical.

The Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) of Achimota Senior High in a statement hit back at the Ghana Education Service (GES) who had earlier directed the school to admit the students.

The PTA also cited 14(1)(e) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana which gives the school the right to set rules in furtherance of education.

Article 14(1)(e) of the 1992 Constitution of Ghana states: “Every person shall be entitled to his personal liberty and no person shall be deprived of his personal liberty except in the following cases and in accordance with procedure permitted by law-

(e) For the purpose of the education or welfare of a person who has not attained the age of eighteen years”.

“We, therefore, stand with the headmistress and welcome into our fold, parents who are ready to abide by the rules and regulations of Achimota School,” the statement said.

The debate on whether all persons irrespective of their religion or culture must conform to the rules and regulations of an academic institution is still very much alive.